Garlic Knots

I woke up yesterday morning with a killer headache.  Even the barest hints of light coming in the windows from the coming sunrise made my temples throb uncontrollably.  I sat down in front of my computer and when standing back up again caused an enormous surge of pain, I knew I was not driving down to Cambridge.

Luckily, the only interview I had scheduled for the day was with a school in Vermont, which would be hard for me to work at anyway with Luke still working in Andover.

So now I play the waiting game.  I sent thank you messages to all of my interviewers, so now the ball is in their collective court.  Hopefully I’ll hear back soon.

In the meantime, it’s back to blogging.  I showed my blog to a friend at the conference (to show her pics of Izzy) and she was like, “wow Anna…you bake a lot.”  “Why thank you very much!” I replied, even though I don’t think it was a compliment.  Whatevs.  I’m comfortable with the amount of time I spend in the kitchen, and don’t feel judged when people comment about it.

I made these garlic knots to complement my lasagna.  They were really fun and easy to make, though I was sad that a lot of my “knots” turned into rolls during their time in the oven.  They were still delicious though, I looove garlic, and these soft, fluffy buns smothered in it really hit the spot.

Garlic Knots

Adapted from Simply Recipes

Makes about 20 knots

Dough:

3/4 cup warm water (105°F-115°F)

1 package (2 teaspoons) of active dry yeast

1 3/4 cups bread flour (can use all-purpose if you don’t have bread flour)

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon sugar

Garlic-Butter Coating:

5 Tbsp unsalted butter

4 cloves garlic, minced

1/4 cup parsley, minced

1 teaspoon salt

Sprinkle the yeast on top of the warm water and let it sit for 5 minutes. Stir to combine and let sit for another 5-10 minutes, until it begins to froth a bit.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, salt and sugar. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the olive oil, then the yeast-water mixture. Mix this together to form a soft dough and knead for 5-10 minutes. Shape the dough into a ball and lightly coat with olive oil. Put it in a large bowl, top the bowl with plastic wrap and set it at room temperature to rise.

When the dough has doubled in size, anywhere from 90 minutes to several hours, cut it in half. Set out a large baking sheet and line it with a silpat or parchment paper. Take one half of the dough and cut it in half. Working with one piece at a time, flatten into a rough rectangle about 5 inches long 1/2 inch thick.

Using a sharp knife, slice the dough into strips of about 1 inch wide by 5 inches long. Cut these strips in half. Take one piece and work it into a snake, then tie it in a knot. The dough will be sticky along the cut edges, so dust these with flour before you tie the knot. Set each knot down on the baking sheet and repeat with the remaining dough. Remember that the dough will rise, so leave some space between each knot.

Once all the knots are tied, paint them with a little olive oil. Loosely cover them with plastic wrap and let them rise again until doubled in size, anywhere from 90 minutes to three hours or so. Toward the end of this rising period, preheat the oven to 400°.

Uncover the knots and bake in the oven 12-15 minutes, or until nicely browned on top.

Meanwhile, melt the butter in a small pot and cook the garlic gently in it just long enough to take off that raw garlic edge, about 1-2 minutes over medium-low heat. Add the salt and parsley and stir to combine. Turn off the heat.

When the knots are done, take out of the oven and let cool for 5 minutes. Paint with the garlic-butter-parsley mixture and serve.

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